Joseph Brant’s Skullduggery – Deposed by Six Nations in 1805.

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MNN. Nov. 6, 2006. Joseph Brant, born a Mohawk and educated by the British, became a British subject, violating Wampum 58.Under Wampum 35, he was appointed a Pine Tree Chief, a ceremonial position with no powers in council. Should any man of the nation assist with special ability or show great interest in the affairs of the nation, if he proves himself wise, honest and worthy of confidence, the chiefs of the League may elect him to a seat among them and he may sit in the council of the League. He shall be proclaimed a Pine Tree, sprung up for the nation, and be installed as such at the next assembly for the installation of chiefs. Should he ever do anything contrary to the rules of the Great Peace, he may not be deposed from office. No one shall cut him down, but thereafter everyone shall be deaf to his voice and his advice. Should he resign from his seat and title, no one shall prevent it.A Pine Tree Chief has no authority to name a successor nor is his title hereditary. His sole responsibility was to translate. The British and their marionette, Brant, illegally sold and signed away large tracts of Mohawk land in New York State and Ontario. He and the British knew full well he had no authority to do this. Therefore, all his transactions were and are fraudulent.Today Canada and Ontario are using Brant’s phony land sales and giveaways as the basis for their claims to our lands. They know very well it doesn’t hold water. The following deposition by the Six Nations Chiefs and War Chiefs was to inform everyone that Brant’s words and deeds were illegal. In 1808 he murdered his own son Isaac. He could never live with the Mohawks because of his treachery. Brant died in 1811 alone in his mansion in Burlington. Fifty years later, he was brought to Brantford where he lies in a Masonic grave. [The document is blurred and we have indicated on our transcript the illegible parts with a ? mark. We apologize for any indeliberate misnomers].

Brant Deposition, 1805.

Copy of a letter from the Chiefs of the Six Nations to Captain Parrish related to the deposition of Captain Brant in possession o.t.t.p.? in ( ceishok?of oBbuffalo)

Onondaga Village of Buffalo, March 30, 1805.

Brethren. It is (erst?) a few words that we, the Six Nations, wish to inform at this time, it is what have been saying at our fireplace in Buffalo Creek. As it is customary for the Six Nations to call Councils for the misconduct of chiefs so as to have all faults related here before such councils, we have learned from information that Captain Brant has not conducted himself to the satisfaction of the Six Nations and according to our Indian customs he is no more a chief. And we the Six Nations all of us agree is no longer to be noticed as a chief in the Six Nations. The following are the names of the principle chiefs in the Six Nations.

Mohawk War Chiefs

Servatoghkaronogaio

Oghnawoia

Oghwanghugawagh

Principle Onondaga Chiefs

Thatodaraho

Otyatarisosark

Tha—atgwane

Kaghnisyongoghto

Staskanishaugh

Otegwagghec

Ononweeghtireh

Kagoutenayen

Ateweanieei

Tkanighstate

Duestherighgoingh

Otsenonghyata

Osehahow

Skatraghthroinglid

Haerghko

Principle Seneca Chiefs

Hari—Brethren

? ?

Yorsing King

Thatekarongas

Kanyatarigo

Thithoyou

Deghohonghtanyand

Dekanaghglonghishen

Kaghskaotern

Deyogengkoohen

Doenghisoase

Aniwaon

Satyonaonton

Ahentyeya

War Chiefs

Diskakee

Karontowanen

Dayoaghgwatekane

Kaneugaraton

Shanakane

Then ne agh gwa

Ska on waghske

Shatekayenton

Diskake

Onwatosogaghtoro

Katserote

Dekagh swaeghston

Oghoiyo

Deghagoughstoudaghgou

Arenghariskou

Aserik

Kahaste

Kanyataryo

Dawaghghiwaghskan

Kataragenyast

Theaghsontagoot

Oghanionyoto

Thagenjowaane

Shisnenatohe

Otyenagwen

Oghnightagowa

Jastotatya & Dekaentye

Principle Chiefs Oneida

Okawa, Joseph

Oghshonwaghtaggtto

Ateriyaghs

Dekagkae a tanagen

Shay hough hast

Kangenghtaghgo

Oersianysentera

Ataweriniese

Thonaghtorgen

Principle Cayuga Chiefs

Thouonwes

Detsinondawesho

Dekawenyon

Atag a seronne

Deyathoreyghgon

Thoronghyougo

Dyanweianon

Otsistone

Tuscarora Chiefs

Aghsbigwasisae

Dewaghtaghgoot

Shaghradowane

The above letter is endorsed on the back Chiefs’ letter respecting Captain Brant, April 15, 1805. In the handwriting of Captain Parrish.

The British had this on file from the earliest times. This proves that the Six Nations have the law on our side and the documents to prove it.

MNN Mohawk Nation News

Kahentinetha2@yahoo.com

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poster: Thahoketoteh

 

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