GET YOUR “COSMIK DEGREE” AT INDIGENOUS MCGILL

 

MNN. Mar. 3, 2024. There’s only one rule when you are in a fight. WIN! As you read “Indigenous McGill”, listen to the maestro, Frank Zappa, who eerily mimics what’s been going on: 

Lyrics

The Mystery Man came over
An’ he said: “I’m outa-sight!”
He said, for a nominal service charge
I could reach Nirvana t’nite
If I was ready, willing ‘n able
To pay him his regular fee
He would drop all the rest of his pressing affairs
And devote His Attention to me
But I said
Look here brother
Who you jivin’ with that Cosmik Debris?
Now what kind of a mask man are you anyway?
Look here brother
Don’t you waste your time on me
The Mystery Man got nervous
An’ he sorta, fidget around a bit
He reached in the pocket of his Mystery Robe
An’ he whipped out a shaving kit
Now, I thought it was a razor
An’ a can of foamin’ goo
But he told me right then when the top popped open
There was nothin’ his box won’t do
With the oil of Afro-dytee
An’ the dust of the Grand Wazoo
He said
“You might not believe this Pancho, but it’ll fix up that war paint for you too”
An’ I said
Look here brother (thank you mask man. thank you)
Who you jivin’ with that Cosmik Debris?
Ah, mask man is a faggot
Look here brother
Don’t you waste your time on me
I’ve got troubles of my own, I said
An’ you can’t help me out
So take your meditations an’ your preparations
An’ ram it up yer snout
“BUT I GOT A KRISTL BOL!”, he said
An’ held it to his horse
So I snatched it
All away from him
An’ I showed him how to do it right of course
I wrapped a newspaper ’round my head
So I’d look like I was Deep
I said some Mumbo Jumbos then
An’ told him he was goin’ to sleep
I robbed his rings
An’ pocket watch
An’ everything else I found
I had that sucker hypnotized
He couldn’t even make a sound
I proceeded to tell him his future then
As long as he was hanging around
I said
“The price of pajamas has just gone up
An’ yer ol’ swarmy have just gone down”
Look here swarmy
Who you jivin’ with that Cosmik Debris?
(Now is that a real poncho or is that a Seattle poncho who can tell anymore?)
Don’t you know
You could make more money in sindication
So don’t you waste your time on me
Ohm shonty, ohm shonty, ohm shonty-ohm
Source: Musixmatch
Songwriters: Frank Zappa
Cosmik Debris lyrics © Munchkin Music Co

Frank Zappa - Cosmik Debris (Visualizer)

NOW READ THE STORY ABOUT “INDIGENOUS MCGILL”:

 

Indigenous McGill

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box 991, kahnawake que. canada J0L 1B0 Continue reading

SYRACUSE COURT: IROQUOIS PEOPLE IGNORED AGAIN IN NEW YORK STATE-US LAND GRAB

Re: Regarding Canadian St. Regis Band of Mohawk Indians, et. al, v. State of New York, et al., Case No. [5:82-CV-0783, 5.82-CV-114,5:89-CV-0829]

EDITORIAL NOTE: We are the original people placed in this part of the world as caretakers. We have always been here and we have covenant relations with everything living here. Everything belongs to our mother, the earth. We acknowledge, respect and give great thanks to her. This makes us all brothers and sisters. This bond never ends. We are the land and the people of the land. Every onkwehonweh knows this. The basis of the kaianerekowa Great Peace is to find the truth.   

Presented Feb 26, 2024 in Syracuse NY:

“We are Kanienkehaka and are here to make a public record of our duty to tell you that whatever happens in that court today is invalid. We are telling you that it is invalid because we object and they do not represent us, the Kanienkehaka.

The US forms agreements with parties within our nations that support its’ interests, and then they suppress everyone else’s voice. This is why they will not allow us into the court room and we are silenced.
We are in Syracuse today with other Onkwehonwe people.
We are all wearing T-shirts that say, “relevant decision maker”. The federal court today is meeting with a group called the ‘Tricouncil’ of Akwessasne’, who have identified themselves as representing the Kanienkehaka.
The Tricouncil do not represent the Kanienkehaka people because their legitimacy comes from outside of our Tekantiokwenhakstah, which is the circle of families that make up the RotInosaunee Confederacy, described in our Great Peace, the Kaienerekowa. You know us as the Six Nations Iroquois Confederacy.
Legitimacy only comes from decisions that are made within our Clans following the consensual decision making protocol. Decisions that come out of this process are transparent and fully vetted, and understood by the people. This has not been followed.
Also, the events taking place in the court today which we think concern a land settlement, uses the 1796 Seven Nations Treaty as its foundation for legitimacy. This treaty was signed between individuals and the United States, and attempted to remove inherent ownership of over 9 million acres of the original Kanienkehaka territory which includes but is not limited to the Adirondacks, the Catskills, and the Mohawk Valley.
The Seven Nations Treaty was illegitimate because it was signed by individuals who did not have the authority to do so. Specifically, Colonel Louis Cook, whose name O’tia:to karonkwen, which means “what identifies him is hung around the neck” , indicates his status as a newcomer to the Confederacy. These newcomers sit against the wall, watch and learn, and make a commitment to the Confederacy, and can never themselves be given full responsibilities. In this understanding, Louis Cook would have never been given the responsibility to negotiate and sign such an agreement. William Gray and Thomas Williams (Teharagwanegen) were also signatories to the Seven Nations Treaty.
The Seven Nations were a confederacy of trading partners consisting of separate villages along the St. Lawrence river valley. They were given the name nations by the English, who had no other frame of reference to understand the economic relationship of these communities. Their Wampum Belt was made by the Catholic Church, identifying them as adherents to their religion. They had no authority to sign away Kanienkehaka lands.
Despite trying to make it known through traditional and legal processes that the Tricouncil does not have the authority to sign away our lands, we have been ignored, and most of our people have been deliberately excluded from the discussions going on right now.
Whatever decision or deal that is made between the United States government, the State of New York, and any other entity and the Tricouncil is invalid. This is for public record”.
—————————————————————
BACKGROUND
THE HAUDENOSAUNEE – MOHAWK -ONEIDA, ONONDAGA, CAYUGA – SENECA – TUSCARORA -TITLEHOLDERS OF THE KANIEN’KEHAKA NATION MADE THE FOLLOWING DECLARATION CONCERNING AKWESASANE LAND CLAIM SETTLEMENT Declaration of Kanien’ke’keha:ka Titleholders concerning Akwesasne Land Claim Settlement. – U.S. District Court – N.D. of N.Y. Filed Feb. 26, 2024, At !0. O’clock 00, John M. Domurad, Clerk. -Syracuse.
This declaration is being stated before the court on behalf of several condoled Rotiiane [chiefs] of the Mohawk Nation Council of Chiefs {MNCC}.
This hearing today has been called by the Magistrate in order to settle any outstanding issues related to the ongoing settlement negotiation. We wish to tell you, the Mohawk Nation council has numerous outstanding issues and concerns regarding the draft settlement, ranging from the Nations implication with the 1796 treaty to the use and occupancy provisions contained in the internal agreement. These concerns have yet to be addressed or seen as relevant to present Mohawk Nation legal council, Alexlandra Page [esq.]. Legal counsel was asked several times to include all condoled leadership as attendees to this hearing, but Alexandra Page [esq] outright denied our request to be present.
Since 2005, the Wolf, Bear and Turtle clan families have not been in agreement regarding Mohawk Nation Council of Chiefs participation in the litigation and settlement. MNCC cannot and should have not proceeded due to our lack of Ska’nikon:ra [our ability to come to one mind]. However, despite this  impasse, certain individuals of the Mohawk Nation Council, along with its representative lawyer, have decided to move forward with settlement negotiations, without the full consensus of the condoled council and “the People of the Longhouse.” We believe this has wrongly given the impression to the court and the rest of the settlement legal council that the Mohawk Nation is a willing party and active participant before this. court.
The Kanien’keha:ka are not American citizens nor are we a “Dependent Domestic Nation”. We are  people who continue to adhere to principles and philosophies entrenched within our very own existence, that. of which is the Kaianere’ko:wa or the constitution of the Rotinonshon:ni. We will forever continue to uphold our responsibility of protecting the land and water for the use and enjoyment of our future generations – as long as the sun shines,  the grass grows and the water flows. Our law preempts any and all paternal orders/law imposed, imagined or written.
Federal courts are an unfit negotiation forum for the Kanien’keha:ka Longhouse People and we are not to be subjects of the US court system – as the Kanienkeha:ka Longhouse People the nation-to-nation framework laid out by the Teiohate Kaswentha [Two Row Wampum]. Two Row Wampum, a treaty of non-interference between two sovereigns, the Rotinononhsion:ni and the federal government. The sovereignty of the United States government came from the Original People of the land, they did not declare independence from the original people of this land. We did not sign a doctrine with Europeans, they signed them with us.
Additionally, we carry the Sewatokhwatshera [One Dish, One Spoon]as our understanding of our relations to and with the land held in collective with all Onkwehon:we. This treaty bars us or any others  from exclusively claiming the lands along the Great  St. Lawrence River. These Onkwehon:we lands and its resources are to be held in common.
The Kanien’keha:kia are able to choose to emancipate from the United States government, tribal government or any entity. We are the host nation. The Kanien’keha:ka, as a nation, has never surrendered jurisdiction through a treaty of surrender agreeable by law in 1948 under Statutes 28 USC 232 and 233 to the State of New York or United States of America. Subsequently, the United States is motherless and cannot exert authority over a mother nation.
The Kaianere’ko:wa, the constitution of the Rotinonsion:ni Confederacy, clearly identifies the women of each clanship within our nations to be the progenitors of the soil and sole titleholders of Kanonhsionni:keh – Country of the Rotinonhsionh:ni. Only the Clanmothers and women of the Rotinonshion:ni have the authority to make important decisions relating to Rotinoshonni lands, whereas the Rotiia:ne and warriors of the Rotinonhsion:ni have the mandate from the women to act in the protection of our territory and to assert our sovereignty.
As One Mind, in consideration of the facts, history, and the welfare of A:se Tahitikonhsontankie, The Faces Yet to Come, of which we are bound by duty to act in their best interest – we cannot agree to any agreement, settlement or treaty that threaten our claim to the land in Kanien:ke, the Mohawk Valley, or to Atirontaksne, our nine million acres in the Adirondacks, of which the Kanien’keha:Lka Nation has never ceded, quitclaimed, extinguished nor relinquished and of which we will maintain the absolute aboriginal title.
The Kanien’keha:ka, as a Nation, reaffirms its position against any and all proposed settlement of our ancestral lands. Having absolute aboriginal title, we shall maintain and exercise our inherent Right to the Land and Right upon it, including but not limited to, travel and sustenance by hunting, fishing, planting and gathering food or medicine and we shall maintain and exercise our Right to live in Peace where we wish upon our land, free from taxation. Furthermore, we shall maintain and exercise our Duty to Keep and take care of the Earth and strive to be in harmony and balance with her. We shall maintain and exercise our Law of Peace, to exist in peace with creation and people.
Tho
Sharenho:wane
Condoled Wolf Clan Roia:ne”
New York State looks at this trial as a prize fight but they don’t know we have Tiger Man McCool on our side. He’s had a  lot of fights. Bobby Bare sings about being a winner:

The hulk of a man with a beer in his hand                                                                                                                                                 He looked like a drunk old fool

And I knew if I hit him rightWell, I could knock him off of that stoolBut everybody, they said, “Watch outHey, that’s Tiger Man McCoolHe’s had the whole lotta fightsAnd he’s always come out the winner”Yeah, he’s a winner
But I had myself about five too manyAnd I walked up tall and proudI faced his back and I faced the factThat he had never stooped or bowedI said, “Tiger Man, you’re a pussycat”And a hush fell on the crowdI said, “Let’s you and me go outside and see who’s a winner”
Well he gripped the bar with one big hairy handThen he braced against the wallHe slowly looked up from his beerAnd, my God, that man was tallHe said, “Boy, I see you’re a scrapperSo just before you fallI’m gonna tell you just a little‘Bout what it means to be a winner”
He said, “Now you see these bright white smilin’ teethYou know they ain’t my ownMine rolled away like ChicletsDown the street in San AntoneBut I left that person cursin’, nursin’ seven broken bonesAnd, uh, he only broke, uh, three of mine andThat makes me the winner”
He said, “Now behind this grin I got a steel pinThat holds my jaw in placeA trophy of my most successful motorcycle raceAnd each morning when I wake and touchThis scar across my faceIt reminds me of all I got by bein’ a winner
Now this broken back was a dyin’ actOf a handsome Harry ClayThat sticky Cincinnati night, I stole his wife away (beat it)But that woman, she gets uglierAnd she gets meaner every dayBut I got her, boyAnd that’s what makes me a winner”
He said, “You gotta speak loud when you challenge me, son‘Cause it’s hard for me to hearWith this twisted neck and these migraine painsAnd this big ole cauliflower earAnd if it wasn’t for this glass eye of mineWhy, I’d shed a happy tearTo think of all that you gonna get by bein’ a winner
I got arthritic elbows, boyI got dislocated kneesFrom pickin’ fights with thunderstormsAnd chargin’ into treesAnd my nose been broke so oftenI might lose if I sneezeAnd, son, you say you still wanna be a winner?
Now, you remind me a lot of my younger daysWith your knuckles a-clenchin’ whiteBut, boy, I’m gonna sit right here and sip this beer all nightAnd if there’s somethin’ that you gotta gain or proveBy winnin’ some silly fightWell, okay, I quit; I loseYou’re the winner”
So I stumbled from that barroomNot so tall and not so proudAnd behind me, I still hear the hoots of laughter of the crowdBut my eyes still see and my nose still worksAnd my teeth are still in my mouthAnd you know, I guess that makes meThe winner

DISCOVERING DEAD CHILDREN FED TO PIGS UNDER QUEBEC LIQUOR BOARD WAREHOUSE

 MNN. Feb. 6, 2024. The Duplessis Orphans have been standing with the Kahnistensera Mohawk Mothers over the issue of unmarked graves of native and non-native children. SAQ is the Quebec Societe des alcools du Quebec which is a government department that distributes wine, beer and spirits to over 400 stores in Quebec.  The SAQ warehouse site is known as the “pigsty cemetary” where dead native and non-native children were allegedly fed to the pigs.
[Translation from French.]
“GRAVES ON SAQ LANDS?   
Nathaëlle Morissette La Presse, February 6, 2024
The possible presence of anonymous graves of orphaned and aboriginal children in a former cemetery located on current SAQ grounds could extend the $300 million expansion of the liquor distribution center, which has been suspended since the beginning of January 2024.

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW. 

The SAQ stoppage of the expansion and modernization of its liquor distribution center was at the request of the Duplessis Orphans and the Mohawk Mothers,l which suspect the presence of graves of native and non-native children. A portion of the SAQ’s land is located on a former cemetery. A meeting is expected to take place between the Crown corporation and the two groups to discuss the setting up of a protocol.

The SAQ suspended the excavation at the request of the Comité des orphelins et orphelines institutionnalisés de Duplessis and Kanien’keha : ka Kahnistensera, a group of aboriginal activists commonly referred to as the “Mohawk Mothers”.  In a January 8 letter they requested the crown corporation to suspended the construction so that “basic precautions” can be put in place.The SAQ liquor distribution center and head office is located in the eastern part of Montreal, near the Louis-Hippolyte-La Fontaine bridge-tunnel.The expansion and automation of the center is scheduled for completion in 2027  and is estimated to cost around $300 million. This includes a new 192,000 sq. ft. building. The SAQ will expand its online offering to 20,000 products, increase warehouse processing speed and offer 24-hour delivery, which is presently not the case. 

“…the SAQ warehouses on Rue des Futailles is a former cemetery that once belonged to the Sœurs de la Providence, [Sisters of the Providence]” according to the notice sent to La Presse . “The site served as an informal cemetery for unclaimed bodies of patients who died at Hôpital Saint-Jean-de-Dieu. It’s possible there are burials of anonymous children, or some named from the Duplessis Orphans, and a strong probability that aboriginal children were also buried on the site.”

The letter from the Duplessis Committee and Mohawk Mothers point to a high probability of anonymous burials of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children on the site. Both parties would like to establish an archaeological and forensic protocol with the SAQ to ensure the protection of human remains prior to excavation. They have requested a meeting with the company’s management. The SAQ confirmed that it would like to discuss the next steps with both groups. “Upon receipt of [the] letter [from the Duplessis Orphans and Mohawk Mothers], SAQ decided not to undertake excavation on the proposed expansion, while establishing a plan of action.”

For the moment, no meeting date has been set.”Official exhumation measures were […] undertaken on this property in the late 1960s, before it was owned by the SAQ,” the Crown corporation stated in an official statement by email to La Presse.

BY THE BOOK. 

According to anthropologist, Philippe Blouin, who works closely with the Mohawk Mothers and acts as their French interpreter, the signatories were only notified of the work stoppage late on Friday February 2nd, a few hours after La Presse had questioned the SAQ about the matter. “It was registered as a cemetery,” says Blouin, who is also a lecturer and doctoral candidate in anthropology at McGill University. “Unofficially, it was called the “pigsty cemetery”. Unclaimed bodies, mostly of children who were at Saint-Jean-de-Dieu, were buried there. Many of the bodies were exhumed and transported to Saint-François-d’Assise Cemetery. By accident, in 1999 during the expansion projects [of the SAQ] some bones were found.”

Their letter stated, “As representatives of the Duplessis orphan and Mohawk communities, we do not wish to see such accidental discoveries happen again,” reads the letter. In 1999 and today, the SAQ asserts that the were “animal remains”.

Regarding the distribution center, Hervé Bertrand, president of the committee representing the Duplessis orphans, is convinced that human bones were involved. If the SAQ won’t cooperate, he won’t hesitate to go to court, he told La Presse.

A ROYAL VICTORIA, TAKE 2? 

The SAQ case is not the only one of interest to the aboriginal group, whose role in Mohawk law is to ensure the preservation of traditional territory. The Mohawk Mothers have gone to Quebec Superior Court and forced a halt to the work planned at the Royal Victoria Hospital for McGill University to expand its campus. The Mohawk Mothers fear that excavation work will destroy possible native burials and clandestine graves. In October the Superior Court forced McGill University and the Société québécoise des infrastructures (SQI) to reinstate the Panel of Expert Archaeologists to carry out proper excavations. A few weeks ago the SQI and the university appealed the ruling. The appeal will be heard on June 11.

The brilliance of this song is because it is being sung by the spirit of our buried children, by The Band Perry: “If I die young , bury me in satin. Lay me down on a bed of roses. Send me on the river at dawn. Send me away with the words of a love song. Or make me a rainbow and I’ll shine down on my mother. She’ll know I am safe with you when she stands under my colors. And life ain’t even gray but she buries her baby. The sharp knife of a short life. Well I have had just enough time. If I die young bury me in satin . . . .”
box 911, kahnawake, que. canada J0L 1B0

AIR PRODUCTS & CHEMICALS INC. WASTE TO BE DUMPED INTO ST. LAWRENCE RI.

MNN. THE FOLLOWING REPORT WAS READ ON KRK1:30 RADIO KAHNAWAKE @ 12:35 PM MON. FEB. 5/24. 

“Feb 5, 2024: as read on K103 Radio, Kahnawake at 12:35

Time Sensitive: Let’s talk about Air Products & Chemicals Inc. 

Nine years ago, I began working in Akwesasne as a family physician. One of the strong currents underlying the health of Akwesasro:non is that the environment is heavily polluted and that many of the people are sick. The high levels of PCBs, lead, mercury, benzene, fluoride, dioxins, arsenic, and cyanide have been documented in many research studies in Akwesasne and are felt to be responsible for the elevated levels of cancers, diabetes, mental health illnesses like dementia and depression, developmental disorders in children, and endocrine and autoimmune disease.

The corporations responsible for this air, water, and soil pollution have done extensive remediation to decrease these chemicals in the environment. But it is never enough. People are still asked to eat only a small amount of fish, garden in soil that is brought from elsewhere, not pick medicines in certain areas, and of course not to drink untreated water from the Kaniatarawenen:en, or the St. Lawrence River. We have a responsibility to be on constant vigilance, stewarding the lands against further damage, so that our ‘Coming Faces’ will be able to live in a healthy environment.

In July 2022, the United Nations officially recognized that a clean, healthy, and sustainable environment is a human right. Both Canada and the United States have also recognized this right. At the same time, to mitigate Climate change, both countries are looking for energy solutions that do not emit carbon into the atmosphere. One company, Air Products and Chemicals Inc., aims to make hydrogen fuel in a facility that will be built in Massena, NY, adjacent and upriver from Akwesasne. I have read all the available documentation.

Specifically, Air Products & Chemicals Inc., will take water from the St. Lawrence River, clean this water using treatment chemicals called ‘biocide’, and then subject it to an electric current, called ‘electrolysis’, and break the water molecules into its component parts of hydrogen and oxygen. The oxygen will be released into the atmosphere, and the hydrogen will be dried, liquified, stored in tankers, and then driven by trucks 500 miles away to be used in the travel industry as clean fuel. It is considered clean because the energy used to make the hydrogen is hydroelectric. The effluent, or waste from the plant, will consist mostly of water, and at 90-degree F will be disposed of into the nearby Grasse River via the Massena Canal. Right now, Air Products & Chemicals Inc., are applying for aState Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (SPDES) Permit to discharge this waste into the river.

There are concerns about many aspects of this project: there are wetlands to be disturbed, trees to be clear cut, and the homes of endangered species like the Northern Long Eared bat and the Monarch butterfly may be affected. Would 90 degrees F water cause thermal pollution to the Grasse River? Would the armoured and sediment cap that has been placed over the riverbed of the Grasse River, sequestering the previous pollution, be affected, and breached? Is it safe to drive hydrogen fuel through our community? Are there truly no archeological sites in the area? The documents that I have read are very detailed, and using science and regulations, Air Products & Chemicals Inc. have done their due diligence and answered most of these questions.

However, we should have a persistent concern. Air Products & Chemicals Inc plans to send its effluent into the Massena Canal. The Massena Canal was built in 1893, flows into the Grasse River, previously provided hydroelectricity to the Alcoa plant, and is no longer in use. The Massena Canal was NOT part of Alcoa’s remediation plan. Will this effluent from the Air Products & Chemicals Inc. discharged into the Massena Canal disrupt the sediment on the canal’s bottom? What is the depth and the flow rate of the canal waters? What does its sediment contain? Does this sediment contain high levels of PCBs that will then be carried to the Grasse River, over the riverbed armoured cap, right to the waters of Akwesasne?

The Air Products report says, “No significant socioeconomic impacts are expected, and the proposed project is not anticipated to result in disproportionately high or adverse impacts to low income and/or minority populations. Subsequently, no mitigation measures are proposed”. The proposed site is also described as ‘previously undeveloped with no history of industrial activity’. These statements are not true. We are downwind and downstream of three Superfund sites in the adjacent areas of this proposed project. There are many research studies that have shown the deleterious effects of contaminants from these Superfund sites on the health of the people of Akwesasne. Superfund sites are polluted locations in the United States requiring a long-term response to clean up their hazardous non-usable material. The Grasse River remediation project was only completed in 2021, but the area has never been remediated to its natural state.

Akwesasne was not listed as a special interest group. Akwesasne was not officially invited to any information and consultation sessions. Notices were only posted in the Watertown and Massena newspapers. Akwesasne community members who attended the July 12, 2023, meeting were reassured that Air Products & Chemicals Inc. would hold an information session in Akwesasne later. Despite many attempts to contact Air Products & Chemicals Inc., this meeting never happened, and the information was eventually obtained through a freedom of information application to the Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC).

Given that we are downstream, adjacent to Massena, and have a very public, historic, ongoing, adverse, distrusting relationship with the corporations responsible for the three Superfund sites, we wonder why our people were deliberately kept out of the plans for this project. We became substantively aware of this project two weeks ago. We have until February 8, 2024, to make our concerns known to the DEC who evaluate the SPDES Permit of Air Products & Chemicals Inc.

I would add at this moment that we, as stewards of our mother, as Okwehonwe — we don’t rip apart the molecules of our mother’s water. We protect the water, give thanks to the water- industrialism no matter how it’s advertised as being “green”, it’s painted, and is about money. They will always have the underlying desire to separate us from the relationships we have to the air, water, and plant life. We must make our voices heard and protect ever acre of wetlands we have. We must make our voices heard and not allow the sleeping waters that contain the contaminated sediment to be awakened.

As it stands, the SPDES permit must be denied or at least delayed. Your voice matters. Please- write, email, or call the DEC and urge them to deny Air Products & Chemicals Inc. the SPDES permit. 

Miranda Gilgore, NYSDEC Region &  Headquarters

State Office Building – 317 Washington St, Watertown, NY 13601

Phone: (315) 785-2245

Email: DEP.R6@dec.ny.gov

 

Ojistoh Horn, MSc, MD, CCFP”

 

Deep Purple sang about this. “Smoke on the water”. “We all came out to Montreux on the Lake Geneva shoreline to make records with a mobile. We didn’t have much time. “Frank Zappa and the Mothers” were at the best place in town. Until some stupid with a flare gun burned the place to the ground. Smoke on the water, fire in the sky. Smoke on the water, fire in the sky… 

thahoketoteh@ntk.com

MohawkMothers.ca

kahnistensera@riseup.net

mohawknationnews.com 

box 991, kahnawake, quebed canada. J0L 1B0

kahentinetha2@protonmail.com

DENY “AIR PRODUCTS” PERMIT BY FEB. 8/24.

MNN. January 31, 2024. There are questions about “Air Products”. We need to know if their product is safe. Please post & distribute this. niawen kowa. MNN.

“Air Products in Massena – the SPDES permit must be denied.

Akwesasro:non have been largely unaware of the plans to open an Air Products and Chemical Incorporated facility in Massena, NY. Massena is located a few miles upstream of Akwesasne on the St. Lawrence River, or Kaniatarawenen:en.

Air Products is advertised as a ‘green’ hydrogen facility. It will use subsidized hydroelectric energy of the Moses Power Dam to run an electrolysis reaction to divide water molecules into their oxygen and hydrogen components. The hydrogen will be stored in tankers, transported by trucks, and sold to large commercial entities as an alternative energy source. This is described as a ‘green’ climate change solution. The facility is currently applying to the Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) for its State Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (SPDES) Permit.

These are important details of Phase one of the Air Products Massena facility:

Once operating, the facility will consume 3 million gallons of water daily from the St. Lawrence River.

In its SPDES permit application, the facility is requesting to discharge water at 90 degrees Fahrenheit into the Grasse River. Will this cause thermal pollution?

Hydrogen is highly flammable (recall the Hindenburg transport balloon?) and an estimated 25 trucks per day will transit east to Interstate Highway 87, straight through Akwesasne Territory.

An undisclosed type and amount of Biocide and Disinfectant will be discharged into the Grasse River, which flows downstream into the St. Lawrence River. What will happen to the plants that were placed in the Grasse River for remediation?

Approximately 80 acres of forestry and wetlands behind Alcoa will be clear-cut – a process that has already begun. These wetlands currently house endangered animals and plant life.

Additionally, the wetlands filter water and their roots strengthen the soil, preventing erosion. These wetlands are in proximity to Alcoa West’s Potliner Disposal Sites, lagoons and landfills containing fluoride, cyanide, PAHs, PCBs, and metals. Destroying these wetlands risks the integrity of our natural ecological barrier between these industrial waste zones and the Kaniatarawenen:en. 

The chemicals listed underlie the incredible contamination of the lands, waters, air, plants, medicines, trees, animals, and fish surrounding Akwesasne. In the 1970’s, Maclean’s magazine described Cornwall Island, a district of Akwesasne, as an island “Unfit for Man or Beast”. Many studies have linked this pollution to serious health problems in the people in Akwesasne. There are anecdotal high rates of cancers, autoimmune, liver, endocrine, diabetes, mental, and other health issues seen by the health workers of the community. These wetlands are integral to our health, as well as those of endangered species of wildlife, plants, insects, and fish. We have a responsibility to steward these forests and wetlands. Chemicals and thermal pollution are not safe for our fish, wildlife, or plant life. We have not been reassured that the integrity of the caps over the Grasse river bed will not be damaged by this proposed industry.

The community of Akwesasne has not been consulted about Air Products’ plans. If this is Phase 1, then what is Phase 2? There has NOT been free, prior, and informed consent of our people to this project. We have a right to know what is happening in proximity to our territory. We should not have had to get this information by a Freedom of Information process. We have a responsibility to steward the land, water, and the air. We must ensure that the historical impact of industrialization does not happen again. We need more information to make informed decisions for the future of ‘The Coming Faces’ and our environment.

As it stands, the SPDES permit must be denied. The due date is February 8, 2024.

Please- write, email, or call the DEC and urge them to deny Air Products the SPDES permit.

Miranda Gilgore,                                                                                                                                                                                  NYSDEC Region 6 Headquarters,                                                                                                                                                            State Office Building – 317 Washington St., Watertown, NY 13601                                                                                                  Phone: (315) 785-2245, Email: DEP.R6@dec.ny.gov

Ojistoh Horn, MSc, MD, CCFP

 

Sarah McLachlan and Robbie Robertson englightened us.  [World on Fire] “Hearts are worn in these dark ages. You’re not alone in this story’s pages. The light has fallen amongst the living and the dying. And I’ll try to hold it in, yeah I’ll try to hold it in. The world is on fire, it’s more than I can handle. I’ll tap into the water, try to bring my share. I’ll try to bring more, more than I can handle. Bring it to the table, bring what I am able. I watch the heavens but I find no calling. Something I can do to change what’s comin’. Stay close to me while the sky is falling. I don’t wanna be left alone, don’t wanna be. alone. The world is on fire, it’s more than I can handle. I’ll tap into the water, try to bring my share. I’ll try to bring more, more than I can handle. Bring it to the table, bring what I am able. Hearts break, hearts mend, love still hurts. Visions clash, planes crash, still there’s talk of Saving souls, still the cold is closing in on us. We part the veil on our killer sun. Stray from the straight line on this short run. The more we take, the less we become. The fortune of one man means less for some. The world is on fire, it’s more than I can handle. I’ll tap into the water, try to bring my share. I’ll try to bring more, more than I can handle. Bring it to the table, bring what I am able. The world is on fire, it’s more than I can handle. I’ll tap into the water, try to bring my share. I’ll try to bring more, more than I can handle. Bring it to the table, bring what I am able.”

 

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“SPACES OF EXCEPTION” Genocide of Indigenous & Palestinians

Photo: Debra White Plume, Oglala Lakota, in the film, “We Love Being Lakota,” which evolved into the film, “Spaces of Exception.”


Spaces of Exception Film Exposes Atrocities and Genocide of Native People and Palestinians

 

By Brenda Norrell, Censored News, November 17, 2023


MONTREAL — The film Spaces of Exception revealing the atrocities and genocide of Native people — Lakota, Navajo, and Mohawk — and of Palestinians — was shown in Montreal at McGill University. It is here at McGill that Mohawk Mothers have an ongoing court battle to search for graves of Native children at the hospital where the CIA conducted MK-Ultra torture experiments.

 
Among those who were involved in the series of films in the project were Debra White Plume and Olowan Sara Martinez, our Oglala Lakota friends of Pine Ridge, South Dakota, now in the Spirit World. Their bold stance as defenders of the water and people was manifest at the Red Warrior Camp at Standing Rock, during the resistance to the Dakota Access Pipeline in North Dakota.
 
At McGill University, the event included the co-editors of the book, The Mohawk Warrior Society: A Handbook on Sovereignty and Survival, with Philippe Blouin and Kahentinehta Rotiskarewake. The film showing was given a small room by the university in an obvious attempt to limit the number attending.
 
‘Spaces of Exception’ is the latest in a series of films, which began with ‘We Love Being Lakota.’
 
Alex White Plume says that the ancient people, the Palestinians, and Native people have been oppressed in the same way. “They are committing genocide after genocide over there.”
 
Debra White Plume says the connection goes beyond solidarity.
 
“It is a spiritual connection.”
 
Debra said that the genocide is rooted in the quest of the oppressors to separate the people, for occupation, and to take the minerals and the land — both in Palestine and on this continent.
 

Matt Peterson and Malek Rasamny, who co-edited The Mohawk Warrior Society: A Handbook on Sovereignty and Survival, directed the feature-length documentary film Spaces of Exception.

The filmmakers said, “Profiling the American Indian reservation alongside the Palestinian refugee camp, Spaces of Exception was filmed from 2014 to 2017 in Arizona, New Mexico, New York, and South Dakota as well as Lebanon and the West Bank. It is an attempt to understand the significance of the land—its memory and divisions—and the conditions for life, community, and sovereignty.”

‘Spaces of Exception’ Standing Rock, Oceti Sakowin Camp, water protectors resisting Dakota Access Pipeline in North Dakota.


Filmmaker Matt Peterson said ‘Spaces of Exception’ includes the Dine’ battling relocation because of Peabody Coal at Black Mesa, the Mohawk Warrior Society and the people of Palestine.

 
“The film investigates and juxtaposes the struggles, communities, and spaces of the American Indian reservation and the Palestinian refugee camp. It was shot over the course of three years in the West Bank and Lebanon, as well as in Arizona, New Mexico, New York, and South Dakota,” Peterson said.
Spaces of Exception film trailer 

“Spaces of Exception features interviews with members of the American Indian Movement, the Mohawk Warrior Society, and Diné families resisting displacement on Black Mesa, as well as members of Fatah, Palestinian environmental and media activists, autonomous youth committees, and the families of political prisoners and martyrs.”

“The film is an attempt to understand the significance of the land – its memory and divisions – and the conditions for life, community, and sovereignty.
 

Akwesasne Mohawk ‘Spaces of Exception’
The first Native land that the filmmakers visited was Pine Ridge in South Dakota, and through activists, were able to reach Olowan Sara Martinez, whose mother had visited Palestinian refugee camps in Lebanon in 1979 as part of a delegation with the American Indian Movement.


“Once she heard about our project she was excited to meet and talk with us, and from that first trip we made the short video We Love Being Lakota with Ojibway artist Adam Khalil,” the filmmakers said.

 

“The video became something of a calling card to introduce and explain our project and approach. As we continued traveling, meeting people, making and showing short films, it became easier and easier.”

We Love Being Lakota is the first in a series of videos and texts from our documentary project The Native and the Refugee, connecting the struggles taking place on Indian reservations in the United States with those in Palestinian refugee camps in the. Middle East.

Olowan Sara Martinez, Oglala Lakota, Pine Ridge

Olowan says in the film, “For us, as young Tokalas, we don’t wanna be stuck in the waiting process, waiting for a handout, waiting for something to go our way. Waiting, waiting, that’s what Fat Taker did was he trained us to wait, trained us to stand in line.”

 

“Watch out. Join or get the hell out of the way.”

The filmmakers said, “RIP Olowan Sara Martinez (1974-2022), who was instrumental in inviting us to film at both Pine Ridge and Standing Rock, and who appeared in our films We Love Being Lakota (2015), Indian Winter (2017), and Spaces of Exception (2019). She was a brilliant, eloquent, inspiring, courageous, and incredibly strong woman who will be greatly missed.”

‘Spaces of Exception’
In Montreal, Spaces of Exception held its Canadian premiere at McGill University.

The “Spaces of Exception” event at McGill University was sponsored by Stasis- groupe d’enquête sur le contemporainGRIP UQAM and the Critical Media Lab.
 
Watch “We Love Being Lakota,” with Debra and Alex White Plume, Olowan Sara Martinez, and scenes from the Occupation of Wounded Knee 1973.
 


The series


We Love Being Lakota
Adam Khalil, Matt Peterson, Malek Rasamny, 2015, 12 min
This video was taken during our December visit to the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Home of the Oglala Lakota, “the fiercest warrior tribe on the continent”, the film takes a meditative look at Lakota identity in the face of US colonialism, and their relationship to the sacred land they have been pushed out of after two centuries of warfare and theft.Men’s Council of the People of the Way of the Longhouse

Adam Khalil, Matt Peterson, Malek Rasamny, 2015, 12 min
Taking place on the Mohawk territory of Akwesasne–on the borders of New York, Ontario and Quebec–this video juxtaposes footage of a special January gathering at their longhouse, featuring elder Paul Delaronde; archival footage of the Mohawk Warrior Society; and shots of the polluted, decaying industrialized remains surrounding their territory.
INAATE/SE/ (excerpt)

Adam and Zack Khalil, 2015, 10 min
“Adam Khalil and Zack Khalil (both Ojibwe) provide a raw take on their ancestral community within the Sault Ste. Marie area — documenting the harmony and debauchery of the Indigenous experience today. This experimental film, now in the works, juxtaposes the voice of the romanticizing settler with contemporary Ojibwe perspectives.” — Gloria Bell, First American Art Magazine.
 

Censored News

Ry Cooder reminds us everybody has a natural home provided by creation:

box 991 kahnawake que. J0L 1B0

FRANCIS BOOTS, WAR CHIEF OF THE MOHAWKS, DIES

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MNN. July 8, 2023. Ayonwaehs – War Chief of the Mohawks, Ateronhiatakon – Francis Boots, Snipe Clan, 73, peacefully passed away on July 5th, 2023. He will be presented at the Kanienkehaka Kaianerehkowa Kanonsesne [longhouse] located at 570 Route 37 in Akweswasne, starting on Tuesday, July 11, 2023 at 2pm, until the funeral service on Thursday, July 13, 2023 at 10:00 am. Burial will take place at the Jocks Cemetery on 136B Jock Road in Akwesasne [NYS]. Funeral arrangements are with Donaldson’s Funeral Home. Donations can be made to the Kanienkehaka Kaianerehkowa Kanonsesne. 

He was born October 27, 1948 at the home of his maternal grandparents Katie and Paul Caldwell. He grew up on Cornwall Island of Akwesasne. He married Lisa Thomas, and was later in a relationship with Margie Marquis. He is survived by his children, Kawenniiosta (Joe), Teioronhiate (Crystal), Mandaque, Sohahiio, Karatohon (Cheryl), Konwanietawi (Zane), his grandchildren, Kai, Nora, Reese, Lita Jane, Odessa, Mskwaa-desiinh, Cala and Kanerahtine. He is survived by his siblings, John, Diane, Harvey, Anna, Yvonne, Jake, Emily and many nieces, nephews and cousins. He was predeceased by his siblings, Peter, James (Julia), Joseph (Barbara), Catherine-Lena (Ray), Margaret (Peter), Elizabeth-Betty (Carl), Fredrick, Richard, Angus (Harriet) and Stephen (Beverly) and in-laws, Harriet, Patricia and Beverly.

Ateronhiatakon, attended Cornwall Island Day School, East Front Public School, St. Lawrence High School and Mater Dei College. In the 1960’s he travelled with the “White Roots of Peace”. He was always prepared at a momen’t notice to help the people. He shared his vast knowledge and experience, teaching our language, and officiating ceremonies. He was a true gift to the people. His kindness and his way of communicating made everyone comfortable, even in uneasy situations.

Francis honored all his teachers, people of the Confederacy, elders and community members with whom he shared his deep knowledge of our traditional ways. 

Aterionhiatakon was always optimistic, “I’m confident that we will survive. In the future I believe that we will not allow our way of life to be tampered with by the colonial powers. The settler peoples have got to understand they too have these instructions to be kind to Mother Earth, to be kind to the rivers, to be kind to the trees and all life. They seem to have forgotten that, and that’s where the conflict is. They too have to come home now. From”The Mohawk Warrior Society – A Handbook on Sovereignty and Survival, Louis Karoniaktajeh Hall”.

OFFICIAL NOTICE OF CEREMONIAL BURIAL OF A WAR CHIEF:

https://mail.proton.me/u/1/inbox/UibxM8b94JsYKQfaknMXdZzqs4lF2dir_tb_Yex8amyg0683xo61hrv_D_zeZVpbwR1PfWS3Ry8wEsIQDeiODQ==

Aterionhiatakon was a great aserakowa whose role at all times is to maintain the peace. Another great Mohawk, Robbie Robertson has something to say about Francis:

The general rode for sixteen daysThe horses were thirsty and tiredOn the trail of a renegade chiefOne he’d come to admireThe soldiers hid behind the hillsThat surrounded the villageAnd he rode down to warn the chiefThey’d come to conquer and pillage
Lay down your armsLay down your spearThe chief’s eyes were sadBut showed no sign of fear
It is a good day to die (It is a good day to die)Oh my children dry your eyesIt is a good day to die
And he spoke of the days before the white man cameWith his guns and whiskyHe told of a time long agoBefore what you call historyThe general couldn’t believe his wordsNor the look on his faceBut he knew these people would rather dieThen have to live in this disgrace
What law have I brokenWhat wrong have I doneThat makes you want to bury meUpon this trail of blood
It is a good day to die (It is a good day to die)Oh my children don’t you cryIt is a good day to die
We cared for the land and the land cared for usAnd that’s the way it’s always beenNever asked for more never asked too muchAnd now you tell me this is the end
I laid down my weaponI laid down my bowNow you want to drive me outWith no place left to go
It is a good day to die (It is a good day to die)Oh my children don’t you cryIt is a good day to die (It is a good day to die)
And he turned to his people and said dry your eyesWe’ve been blessed and we are thankfulRaise your voices to the skyIt is a good day to die
Oh my children don’t you cry (don’t you cry)Dry your eyesRaise your voice up to the skyIt is a good day to die

Contact.  kanonsesneh@gmail.com

Mohawk Nation News. kahentinetha2@protonmail.com

TWO ROW TIMES: “AND SO THE PEOPLE ARE AFRAID”

 

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MNN. Wed. July 5, 2023. This is a discussion with the men’s fire about standing up to the HCCC [Haudenosaunee Council of Chiefs] and HDI [Haudenosaunee Development Insttute] which are private incorporated companies. This is the intervention by the men’s fire against HDI and HCCC to settle all the Ontario and Canada land claims by Canada. They did not ask the people if they could do this because they know all the land is not for sale. The onkwehonweh [natural people of creation] have been given all the land of Turtle Island. The people discussed the responsibilities under the kaiaerekowa of each and every one of us.  

How the corporation system is suppose to work!

https://tworowtimes.com/editorial/and-so-the-people-are-afraid-a-discussion-with-the-mens-fire-about-standing-up-to-the-hccc-and-hdi/

The Weather Girls are giving us some insight into the coming storms on the horizon:

For more information on the court case see :  MohawkMothers.ca

Contact: thahoketoteh@ntk.com MNN Court Correspondence, box 991, kahnawake quebec canada

kahentinetha2@protonmail.com

NEW/OLD BAND COUNCIL HUSTLE

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MNN. June 27,  2023.

Here’s how it goes. A band council entity is set up. They offer to help their people. Somebody or a community group get some monies to “benefit the community”, but the band council or its nominee own all the assets from it and can tell us what we can or cannot do. The band council and its entities use our funds to ingratiate,  enrich themselves, get into conflict of interest situations and possible fraud.

Remember, the band councils are corporate agents of Canada that were set up on Oct. 25, 1924 to help Canada take and control our land and resources.

                            Said the onkwehonweh to the canadien!

For example, an incorporated community association [the band council] invites a so called non-profit society in to build a community hall for the people. In the end it benefits mostly them and Canada, not the people.

The meeting is held at a band council building. The main host is a guy who works for the band council, who is directly involved with the process. Canada and the provinces have millions of dollars in program funds they offer to support projects they deem will ‘benefit’ the community!  

As a part of the band council corporate apparatus, the  nominee employee helps push the grant application forward. He gets their documents together and registers them to be a not-for-profit society in order to receive the funds.

The host suggests they build a structure that would cost $500,000. There will be taxes for each household because this incorporated association is no longer indigenous. 

The mentor asks for $300,000 for the logs; $800,000 for the lock up; then another $200,000 for the construction of the building, then transportation and putting it together on the site, plus expenses to hook up the water, electricity, and sewage. If they do not get the initial grant, then the costs for the project somehow rise to $1.5. to $2 million which has to be borrowed by the villagers.  In most cases most of these enterprises are not needed.

When the mentor, on behalf of the association gets the grant, he owns and leases it to the society for $1 a year. The purpose is not to benefit the community as mostly they never see the money. 

 Public funds are being used to enrich the corporate non-native band council entity. Out of the $1.5 million or more granted or loaned, the building costs $500,000 and who knows where the rest goes.

The band council cannot be part of any community since they are a foreign for-profit crown corporation.  The employee/mentor dupes the people. 

The conflict of interest is because the band council employee cannot have anything from this grant application process for himself.  It was his idea and he has been working with his ‘band council superiors’ to push this project  through.

The Supreme Court [Beverly McLachlan] unanimously ruled that the tsilhqot’in does have a claim of 750 sq. Km [680 sq. mi.] of land. This decision is a precedent for all turtle island.

The colonial Supreme Court held that aboriginal title constitutes a beneficial interest in the land, the underlying control of which is retained by the Crown. Why? We are caretakers of turtle island. Indigenous people are sovereign and have all duties and  responsibilities to decide everything. Also, to proactively use and manage the land, including its natural resources. But the foreign entity, the Crown, gave themselves the right to override aboriginal title in the so called “public interest”!!

This scam is practiced on every native until all our land is completely taken from us. Everything the intruders do is void as no land can be conveyed. A foreign for-profit private crown corporation does not have any right to deal with the “general public”, including band councils. A private company can only deal with their own employees, property and dependants. “Public” funds are used to enrich themselves by requisitioning this legitimate native property without using their own assets to do it. In fact, the funds could be coming from our “Indian Trust Funds”.

The band councils work dilligently for Canada. 

Sections 35/52 of the Constitution Act of Canada 1982 and its band councils do not exist according to our way. Original people are caretakers and sovereigns of all turtle island for all future generations. The Crown has no claim on anything.

This is a new way to genocide us by “reconciliation ” with Canada through forced citizenship without physical slaughter as they did in the past.

Rumormillnews 224893 CGI’S empyyreal:CRD in Sook BC, Canada engaged in money laundering, unjust enrichment and fraud with proof. Sat. 24-Jun2023H

Lester Flatt and Earl Scruggs had an insight into the goings on of Indian reservations in Canada in the “The Ballad of Jed Clampett”: 

Come and listen to a story ’bout a man named JedPoor mountaineer barely kept his family fedThen one day he was shooting for some food,And up through the ground come a bubbling crude(Oil that is, black gold, Texas tea)
Well the first thing you know old Jed’s a millionaireKin folk said Jed move away from thereSaid California is the place you oughta beSo they loaded up the truck and they moved to Beverly(Hills that is, swimming pools, movie stars). . .  .

 MNN Court Correspondent thahoketoteh@ntk.com 

Box 991, kahnawake, que. canada MNN kahentinetha2@protonmail.com 

MOHAWK WARRIOR SOCIETY: HANDBOOK ON SOVEREIGNTY & SURVIVAL Podcast

 

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MNN. June 20, 2023. The Kahnistensera, Mohawk Mothers of kahnawake, kanesatake, and akwesasne knew Louis karonhiaktajeh Hall, and were greatly influenced by his stories, philosophy and farsightedness. This podcast reveals many of his past, current and future insights into what lay ahead for the Mohawks. 

 

Mohawk Warrior Society

 

The Mohawk Warrior Society is one of the most successful militant organizations in North America. Their predecessors were key to the defeat of the French in Quebec and the United States in the War of 1812. Today, the Warriors are best known for their role in the 1990 Oka standoff against the Canadian army. In the new book, The Mohawk Warrior Society: A Handbook on Sovereignty and Survival, the movement for the first time tells its own history.

We are joined by the editors of this unique anthology of resistance, Philippe Blouin, Matt Peterson, Malek Rasamny and Kahentinetha Rotiskarewake and also by Kwetiio and Karennatha who, along with Kahentinetha, are members of the group Kanien’kehà:ka Kanistansera, the Mohawk Mothers.

Louis will always be honored by the people. The world will never forget the warrior flag he designed. Even the Kingsmen back in the 60’s honoured Louis: Ah Louie Louie. Oh no, Said we gotta go. Yeah yeah yeah. Yeah yeah. Baby. Louie Louie. Oh baby. Said we gotta go. A fine little girl. She waitin for me. Catch a  ship, across the sea. Sail that ship out all alone. Me never think how. I’ll make it home. I’ll make it home. Ah Louis Louie. No no no no. Make it home. . . .  

YouTube player

Episode: 034 Mohawk Warrior Society
Date: 18 June 2023 | Length: 70:23
Briefing Notes

 Karoniaktajeh Louis Hall. The Mohawk Warrior Society: A Handbook on Sovereignty and Survival. (PM Press 2023)
 The Native and the Refugee. (Electronic Intifada 2015)
 Jon Elmer on Mohawk blockades (Al Jazeera June 2010)
 Jon Elmer on the Mohawk Warrior Society and the Canadian military (Inter Press 2007)
 see also The Brief Podcast 023: 500 Years of Indigenous Resistance with Gord Hill

Contact thahoketoteh@ntk.com ,

MNN Court Correspondent

Mohawknationnews.com Box 991, kahnawake que. canada J0L 1B0

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